Monday, 30 November 2015

Three Oral Hygiene Tips for Men

When it comes to personal oral hygiene, not all men are as attentive to their teeth as women. Starting with the checkup, surveys suggests men are more likely to see a dentist only in the event of a problem. So, guys, learn how to step up your oral care routine with the following tips for maintaining a healthy smile and preventing oral health problems before they start.

Toothbrush Tips
Brushing is just one part of keeping your mouth clean - doing so twice a day, in particular. However, the average man brushes his teeth 1.9 times a day, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). It's not enough to brush quickly and be on your way; two minutes of thorough cleaning is your most effective approach. Keep in mind you don't need to brush hard during this process. Use a soft-bristled brush such as Colgate® Slim Soft™ and brush gently at a 45-degree angle.

Some helpful hints: Replace your toothbrush every three to four months, rinse it after each use and store it in an upright position to air dry. Storing it in a container actually allows microorganisms to grow on the brush, explains the American Dental Association (ADA), so it's best to avoid this method.

Sports and Dental Injuries
Playing contact sports can lead to trauma in unexpected places, and this includes broken, chipped or lost teeth. Wear a mouthguard when you're on the field and a helmet when you're on your bike. Ultimately, see your dentist as soon as possible after experiencing an incident to quickly assess the damage and determine what can be done to fix it.

To read the entire article written by Margie Monin Dombrowski, please visit Colgate.com 

Baker Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
Craig J. Baker, DMD, PL
13501 Icot Boulevard, Suite 101
Clearwater, FL 33760
(727) 531-4462
TBSmiles.com

Wednesday, 25 November 2015

Monday, 23 November 2015

A New Year's You: Dental Health Resolutions

Your dental health is an important part of your overall wellness, and the New Year is a great time to create resolutions for improving your health. Many people have dental health resolutions that range from improving their toothbrushing habits to completing delayed dental treatment. Understanding the benefits of your particular resolutions can be motivating and rewarding. Whatever your goals might be, it is important to take small steps to achieve them. Consistency is key with any resolution that you make.

Improving Toothbrushing and Flossing Habits
Perhaps you would like to improve your oral health. Daily toothbrushing and flossing is a sure and simple way to improve your oral health. For successful bacterial plaque removal, it is important to brush at least twice a day using an appropriately sized, soft-bristle, manual or electric toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste. When you brush your teeth, gently position the toothbrush bristles at a 45-degree angle toward the gumline and move the toothbrush across the teeth to effectively remove bacterial plaque. It is also important to floss at least once per day to remove bacterial plaque and food that has accumulated throughout the day. Your toothbrush should be replaced every 3 to 4 months, as well as after you have a cold or flu or if the bristles are frayed. Daily toothbrushing and flossing help to prevent gingivitis (gum disease), tooth decay and halitosis (bad breath). The daily use of antimicrobial and fluoride mouthrinses also helps to improve your oral health.

To read the entire article written by Yolanda Eddis, please visit Colgate.com

Baker Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
Craig J. Baker, DMD, PL
13501 Icot Boulevard, Suite 101
Clearwater, FL 33760
(727) 531-4462
TBSmiles.com

Wednesday, 18 November 2015

After-Hours Emergency Dentistry

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to about after-hours emergency dentistry.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Baker Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
Craig J. Baker, DMD, PL
13501 Icot Boulevard, Suite 101
Clearwater, FL 33760
(727) 531-4462
TBSmiles.com

Sunday, 8 November 2015

Are You Flossing Or Just Lying About Flossing? The Dentist Knows

There's nothing like jamming a waxed piece of string between your tightest molars and sliding it back and forth. And who doesn't do that once a day, just as the dentist prescribes?

Well, a lot of us. Twenty-seven percent of adults lie to their dentists about how often they floss their teeth, a survey released Tuesday found. Not only that, but more than a third of people surveyed would rather be doing unpleasant chores than flossing their teeth daily. Fourteen percent would rather clean the toilet. Nine percent would rather sit in gridlock traffic for an hour. And 7 percent would rather listen to small children crying on a plane.

Actually, that 27 percent sounds awfully low. When we called up Dr. Joan Otomo-Corgel, a periodontist and president of the American Academy of Periodontology, which conducted the survey, she said: "Is that all?"
More than a third of Americans would rather do an unpleasant activity than floss.
American Academy of Periodontology

She's not the only oral health professional who thinks many patients are fibbing when they say they're flossing. "I am shocked," says Dr. Sally Cram, a periodontist and spokesperson for the American Dental Association, via email. "Given my experience with patients in my practice I thought it would be higher!"

To read the entire article written by Jessie Rack, please visit NPR.org

Baker Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
Craig J. Baker, DMD, PL
13501 Icot Boulevard, Suite 101
Clearwater, FL 33760
(727) 531-4462
TBSmiles.com

Sunday, 1 November 2015

20 Mistakes You're Making With Your Teeth

Taking care of your pearly whites isn't rocket science, but it's easy to slip into habits that could cause heartache -- er, toothache -- in the long run. We got the latest on giving your teeth the TLC they need from two New York City pros: Alice Lee, DDS, an assistant professor in the Department of Dentistry for Montefiore Health System, and Alison Newgard, DDS, an assistant professor of clinical dentistry at Columbia University College of Dentistry, will clue you in on where you could be going wrong.

Multitasking while you brush
Every minute in the morning feels precious, so it's tempting to brush your teeth in the shower or while scrolling through your Twitter feed. "To each his own," says Dr. Newgard, "but I prefer patients to be in front of a mirror, over the sink; you can be sure to hit all the surfaces of your teeth, and you'll do a more thorough job when you're not distracted." Better to leave the bathroom a few minutes later having given proper attention to each step of your prep.

Overcleaning your toothbrush
Thinking about running your brush through the dishwasher or zapping it in the microwave to disinfect it? Think again: While we've all seen those stories about toothbrushes harboring gross bacteria, the CDC says there's no evidence that anyone has ever gotten sick from their own toothbrush. Just give your brush a good rinse with regular old tap water, let it air-dry, and store it upright where it's not touching anyone else's brush. More drastic cleaning measures may damage your brush, the CDC notes, which defeats its purpose.

Using social media as your dentist
The web is full of weird and (seemingly) wonderful DIY dental tips that can hurt much more than they'll help. Read our lips: Don't even go there. "I've heard of patients who go on Pinterest and find ways to whiten their teeth there--by swishing with straight peroxide, for example--which are not good for their teeth," Dr. Newgard says. "Use ADA-approved products that have been tested." (Another online tip to skip: trying to close up a gap in your teeth with DIY rubber band braces.) 

To read the entire article written by Lauren Oster, please visit HuffingtonPost.com 

Baker Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
Craig J. Baker, DMD, PL
13501 Icot Boulevard, Suite 101
Clearwater, FL 33760
(727) 531-4462
TBSmiles.com

Antibiotics & Your Heart

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about antibiotics and your heart.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Baker Cosmetic & Family Dentistry
Craig J. Baker, DMD, PL
13501 Icot Boulevard, Suite 101
Clearwater, FL 33760
(727) 531-4462
TBSmiles.com